Seasonal Cat Stuff: November 2008 Archives

Have you ever wondered what are you going to do with the turkey giblets? okay, maybe you haven't wondered that, but when you prepare your turkey for your family and friends this Thanksgiving, don't forget about Kitty.

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can_you_feed_cats_too_much_milk.jpgThat little package of organ meats and the neck can become the most deliscious Thanksgiving meal for your cat. Never throw them away, if you don't have time to cook it now, freeze it for later when you have a bit more time to make a special meal for your cat. These recipes make a delicious homemade cat food Thanksgiving Soup.

There are a lot of weird recipes out there for cats that contain all sorts of ingredients that a cat would never touch in a million years if it wasn't ground up and put in a can or kibble. This recipe doesn't contain grains or dairy and can be served raw or cooked. If you want to try another recipe that contains brown rice, try this Thanksgiving homemade cat food recipe.

I caution you about serving your cat raw meat if he has been eating a dry kibble or canned cat food diet. As weird as it sounds, the transition to a raw diet takes careful planning and a slow transition so you don't make your cat sick. I'll be blogging about that in the new year as I make the transition to homemade raw cat food for Neo.

Thanksgiving Cat Food Recipe - Turkey Soup:

1 cup water (or enough water to cover the turkey neck)

1 turkey neck

1 turkey giblet

1 turkey liver

1 turkey heart

1/2 cup fresh uncooked pumpkin (if using canned pumpkin, add it in at the end)

cat_food_prey.jpgPut the turkey neck in a pot with the water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 30 - 60 minutes to cook the meat through and to leach some nutrients from the bones.

Add in the giblet, liver, heart and pumpkin and continue to simmer for 10 15 minutes or until the organ meats are cooked through and the pumpkin is soft and mashable.

Cool the mixture to room temperature and debone the neck, making sure to remove all the bones. Then chop or blend the meat and pumpkin. Turkey bones splinter easily and can choke your cat so an alternative is to put the meat and bones into a heavy duty blender (like the Vitamix or Blendtec blenders) and blend until the mixture is smooth.

Add in your supplements if you cook for your cat regularly and have them on hand, but if you cook for your cat only occasionally, supplements are not required. But a little fish oil is always nice for a shiny coat and to make the dish more palatable.

If your cat is not used homemade food, you may want to mix this Turkey soup with their canned or dry food to prevent vomiting, or other digestive upset. Try a 1/4 cup Raw Turkey Soup with 1/4 cup canned or dry food.

Raw Turkey Soup - Thanksgiving Cat Food Recipe:

1 turkey neckcats-eating.jpg

1 turkey giblet

1 turkey liver

1 turkey heart

1/4 cup fresh uncooked pumpkin

1 cup water for blending or grinding

Place all ingredients, bones and all in a meat grinder, food processor or heavy duty blender (like the Vitamix or Blendtec blenders). Process until the bones, organs and pumpkin are liquified and there are no large pieces.

Add in your supplements like taurine, fish oil and vitamins if you give them to your cat and serve. If your cat is not used to raw food, you may want to mix this raw soup with their canned or dry food to prevent vomiting, or other digestive upset. Try a 1/4 cup Raw Turkey Soup with 1/4 cup canned or dry food.

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If you're new here, please consider subscribing to my feed. If you love cats, you'll enjoy the posts we place online every day.  Thanks for visiting!

Pictures_cats_servel_pumkin.jpgIf you want to make kitty a treat for Thanksgiving, I posted a homemade cat food thanksgiving turkey recipe that is always a hit with Neo.

The ASPCA is always looking out for animals. Here are their latest tips for a safe thanksgiving.

Is it bad that Thanksgiving isn’t for another couple of weeks and we can’t get food off the brain? But.friends, family and feasts—the main ingredients for holiday fun—can actually result in distress for pets. Not only can too many table scraps set furry tummies a-rumble, but many animals get anxious at the change in household routine. Says the ASPCA’s Dr. Steven Hansen, Senior Vice President, Animal Health Services, which includes the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center in Urbana, IL, “As you begin to prepare for a festive season, remember to be wary of activities that can be potentially dangerous to pets.”

The following safety tips will help to ensure a safe and fulfilling (key syllables being “filling”) Thanksgiving for you and your pets:pictures_wild_cat_lion_pumpkin.jpg

Talkin’ Turkey: Giving your pets a little nibble of turkey is okay, just be sure that it’s boneless and fully cooked. Raw or undercooked turkey may contain salmonella bacteria, and dogs can choke on bones, which splinter easily.

A Feast Fit for a Kong: While the humans are chowing down, give your cat and dog their own little feast. Stuff their usual dinner—with a few added bits of turkey, dribbles of gravy or vegetables like sweet potato and green beans—inside a Kong toy. They’ll be happily occupied trying to get their meal out, and way too busy to come begging for table scraps.

Sage Advice: This peppery herb makes stuffing taste delish, but sage also contains essential oils and resins that can cause pets to suffer stomach upset and possible depression of the central nervous system.

Battery Power: The holiday season means lots of cameras, radios and other battery-operated electronics. Please don’t leave batteries lying around. If swallowed, they can cause choking or obstruction; if punctured, the chemicals in alkaline batteries can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus.

Cat_ID_Halloween.jpgIf you suspect your pet has ingested a harmful substance, on Thanksgiving or at any time, please call your vet or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.

*If you have specific questions about what’s safe for Thanksgiving or the winter holidays, ask our toxicology experts next Friday in a live chat on the ASPCA Online Community.

Have fun including your pets in your holiday celebrations, and thanks for caring about their safety! After all, pets are family, and no one knows that better than you.

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