Recently in Do cats need supplements? Category

cat-napped_pictures_of_cats.jpgStudies have shown that 30% of cats over 8 years of age, and a stunning 90% of cats over 12 years of age, have arthritis (osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease). These figures should give the veterinary community, which doesn't give nearly as much thought to arthritis in cats as it does to dogs, something to think about. What is generally perceived as "slowing down" or "a little stiff" may be a sign of significant joint deterioration, and probably causes some degree of discomfort in most older cats.

Arthritic cats often gradually stop jumping up as high as they once did, and may be reluctant to use the stairs. (Arthritis can cause litterbox problems if there is not a box on every level of the home.) Providing "steps" (a box or stool, for instance) up to a bed, chair, or other favorite high spots may be greatly appreciated by an older cat.

Cats cannot adequately metabolize many of the arthritis and pain medications commonly given to dogs, such as carprofen (Rimadyl). Moreover, ibuprofen (Advil), naproxyn (Aleve), and acetaminophen (Tylenol) are all highly toxic to both cats and dogs. Meloxicam (Metacam) is a newer NSAID that is commonly used for post-operative pain but only for a short time. Some experts claim it can be given long-term at a very low dose, but others are wary of the significant potential for kidney damage in cats. Aspirin can be used, but the dose and schedule are extremely limited; never give your cat aspirin without your vet's advice.

The good news is that there are simple, inexpensive nutritional supplements that are very effective and, most important, very safe. Supplements for arthritis include: glucosamine sulfate (250 mg per day), and MSM (methyl-sulfonyl-methane) (200-400 mg per day). Both of these supplements have excellent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

pictures_cats_arthritis.jpgGlucosamine supplies the basic building blocks of cartilage and helps maintain the fluid that cushions and nourishes the joints, and MSM provides elemental sulfur for the body to make certain amino acids and other compounds. But they are not quick fixes-it may take 3-5 weeks for improvement to be noticeable (MSM may take less or more time), and they must be given daily without fail to prevent return of pain. They may not work in all cats. But many guardians notice significant improvement in their cat's activity and flexibility. Glucosamine is often packaged together with chondroitin, another cartilage compound. However, the evidence is less clear that chondroitin is effective, and it is much more expensive. Plain glucosamine (sulfate only, not hydrochloride) is adequate in most cases.

Another cartilage building block, hyaluronic acid, is also available in oral form. This is the basic ingredient of Adequan, a drug commonly injected directly into affected joints. However, these injections need to repeated regularly and there is always a risk of infection. Hyaluronic acid now comes in oral capsules, but the most effective form appears to be a saline-based liquid called "Hyalun." A cat would need at most a few drops per day, although if you also have dogs (or if you have joint problems yourself!) it is a good way to go.

Some herbs, such as Boswellia (frankincense), appear to be effective anti-inflammatories, but few herbs have been thoroughly studied for safety in cats. Boswellia is traditionally used in combination with other herbs in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine. Since some herbs can be extremely toxic to cats, it's best to consult with a veterinarian trained in the use of western or Chinese herbs (see below).

The antioxidant algae blend, BioSuperfood (read more about this in the Little Big Cat Free Article Library) may also minimize the inflammation and pain of arthritic joints.

Omega-3 fatty acids also have excellent anti-inflammatory properties; we recommend Nordic Naturals pet products for their purity and safety.

white_cat.jpgFrom a holistic viewpoint, no physical condition is simply physical. In energetic terms, disease, including arthritis, starts on the energetic plane and progresses through the mental and emotional spheres before manifesting itself in the physical body. One way to address this is through the use of flower essences, which can heal the imbalances on the mental and emotional planes. Another way to look at this is that mental "stiffness" ultimately contributes to stiffening of the physical joints. Our sister company, Spirit Essences, has developed an essence remedy called Creak-Away that's designed to keep the animal mentally and emotionally "flexible" and minimize the energetic stresses that contribute to the development of arthritis.

Acupuncture, chiropractic, herbs, homeopathy, specific nutritional strategies and other holistic treatments may also be helpful for arthritic cats. For a practitioner in your area, visit or call the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association at (410) 569-0795.

Dr. Jean Hofve is a retired holistic veterinarian with a special interest in nutrition and behavior. Her informational website, http://www.littlebigcat.com, features an extensive free article library on feline health and pet nutrition, as well as a free e-newsletter. Dr. Hofve founded Spirit Essences Holistic Remedies for Animals (http://www.spiritessence.com) in 1995; and it remains the only line of flower essence formulas designed by a veterinarian. She is a certified Medicine Woman within the Nemenhah Native American Traditional Organization who uses holistic remedies as a part of body-mind-spiritual healing.

Do cats really need supplements? Most people are doing the best they can to keep themselves and their cats healthy while still trying to save money. In this economic downturn, many people are turning to less expensive cat food to save some money and to hang on to their pets longer. But what about nutrition? how can you ensure your cat gets proper nutrition while eating cat food that may not have enough quality nutrition?

E3FAF546-CCDC-4F78-80F6-F44121215731.jpgSupplements. I know, I know, if you aren't able to buy supplements yourself, why would you start buying supplements for your cat? let me explain.

Fish oil, specifically cod liver oil is inexpensive and provides minerals that help keep eyes, joints, heart and lungs healthy. Not only for you cat, you can take it too! Cod liver oil is a high quality source of Omega 3 fatty acids.

Dr. Michael Fox says, "I get tired of plugging fish oil at every turn, but it IS a miracle supplement.... Cod liver oil, up to a tablespoon a day...may help your poor cat."

If you go to a pharmacy, or grocery store, you can find cod liver oil in capsule or liquid form. The oil is not expensive at all - I paid $5.00 for a quart and Neo loves it. Keep the oil refrigerated and give it to your cat as a treat, 1 tsp at a time. Your cat will love the fishy flavor and you can rest assured that you are providing good nutrition for your cat without spending too much money.

Whether it's caused by sunburn, parasites, medication, obesity or dry skin, cat dandruff is irritating and it could signal possible healthy problems. Cat dandruff occurs in healthy cats at the base of the tail because that is a hard to clean area, but some cats get dandruff all over their bodies for several reasons.

Pictures_of_cats_grooming.jpg

Cat Dandruff can be caused by:

*sunburnt skin that dies and peals off

*parasites that are living on your cats body

*lack of humidity in the air

*sensitivity to carpets, perfumes or other irritants in your home or yard

*medications that cause dry, itchy scalp

But the one major cause of Cat Dandruff is:

*DRY CAT FOOD

You see cats don't get enough moisture in their bodies if all they are fed is dry cat food. By nature, in the wild, cats get moisture from the live prey they hunt and eat, but our domestic feline friends don't get that moisture. And it is just not in their nature to drink enough water to compensate for it. So if you feed your cat dry food, start giving him moist canned, homemade or raw food and you'll notice a difference.

But what if you already feed your cat canned food and he still has dandruff?

Pictures_of_cats_dry_cat_food_dandruff.jpg

There is something else that you can do and you'll notice health benefits beyond measure. Give your cat Essential Fatty Acids, you know, the ones you hear about all the time. Omega 3 - there are several formulas out there, but the best source is fish oil. Especially Cod Liver Oil. You can get it anywhere now, grocery stores, drug stores, health food stores. Just put a few drops on your cat's soft food and slowly work up to a teaspoon.

Cats love the taste so you won't have a hard time convincing them to take their Cod Liver Oil!

You should always talk to your vet about any supplements you are thinking about giving to your cat. If you are looking for a holistic vet you can find one at the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association.

The final word on supplements. Do cats need supplements? or is this just something that health conscious humans think their cats need?

There are basic requirements that your cat needs daily to live a healthy life. Good quality proteins and amino acids are essential, especially taurine, without it, your cat will likely die or suffer serious medical conditions such as heart disease.

efa-caps.jpg

Then there are vitamins and minerals that cats need in the proper ratio and in the proper form. And of course, Essential Fatty Acids - yes cats need fish oil too! Maybe that's why they like fish so much!

So with all these requirements, how do you know if your cat is getting enough? The bottom line is talk to your vet about it. So here are some guidelines for answering the question, do cats need supplements?

Latest Pictures

Cat Wallpapers